If you have been charged with a crime in Naples Florida that could land you in jail and cost you large amounts of money, with the continued threat of damaging your entire future, it is imperative that you research criminal defense attorneys to assess the value of their services based on 1) case load; 2) jury trial case – experience; 3) years practicing – experience; 4) success rate; 5) venue; and 6) case diversity.

Choose a skilled attorney.

Hiring your own criminal defense lawyer is a smarter option instead of accepting the services of a public defender. It may be better to borrow funds to hire a professional who choses your case after reviewing it.  Public defenders do not choose a client’s case based on its merit but rather, they are burdened with it as part of their case load, which may sway them toward plea deals.  Hiring an experienced professional who knows how to navigate Florida criminal laws and evidence to reduce jail time and fines is why you should call the offices of Michael M. Raheb

Know the possible penalties.

Florida Statutes 812 addresses theft. Criminal theft is when a person takes something without the owner’s consent and includes:

  1. Larceny – taking personal property without intending to return it.
  2. Petty theft – first degree: taking personal property greater than $100 but less than $300; second degree: taking property valued at less than $100.
  3. Grant theft – first degree: taking property from another that is worth more than $100,000.; second degree: taking property that is valued between $20,000 and $100,000; third degree: taking property valued between $300. And $20,000.
  4. Theft by conversion – unlawfully keeping someone’s property that was obtained lawfully.
  5. Theft of lost property – keeping property that someone else lost or mislaid.

Criminal theft is prosecuted by the state and if a person is found guilty, they can end up with community service, fines and/or prison time.  If you have been charged with larceny in the State of Florida, you should immediately seek out a criminal law attorney because the charges may be severe, and you will need to address every facet of the specific crime activity you are guilty of with someone who knows how to navigate through the various nuances of criminal grand theft charges in Naples.

Punishment by criminal grand theft felony charge.

  1. A third-degree grand theft felony can carry up to 5 years imprisonment and up to $5,000 in fines.
  2. A second-degree grand theft felony is more serious because it had “specific intent” and a defense attorney will need to disprove this in order to reduce the imposed punishment.
  3. A first-degree grand theft felony charge can impose harsh penalties including up to 30 years in prison and fines up to $10,000.

Fight the charges for your future.

It is imperative that you seek professional experienced criminal law professionals to work on your case.  It is important to note that penalties will vary from case-to-case and are dependent on the specifics of the criminal act, the amount of money that was stolen by you, and if there was a threat of violence to the victim in the pursuit of the stolen money associated with robbery, and whether or not you have a previous criminal record.  Consequences of a grand theft charge will include long-term difficulties securing housing, employment and membership in certain community functions or political offices.

Hire an attorney who can offer personalized attention, and has a long history of success in criminal litigation.  Call The Law Offices of Michael M. Raheb to discuss the particulars of your case because a felony charge is a serious matter and possible legal strategies for your case may offer a reduction in charges and fines depending upon the circumstances of the arrest and past criminal history.

 

The Law Offices of Michael M. Raheb, P.A.
2423 First Street,
Fort Myers FL 33901
Office: 239-226-0888
Fax Number: 866-949-0888

 

Sources:

http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&URL=0900-0999/0932/Sections/0932.704.html

https://www.flsenate.gov/Laws/Statutes/2018/812.133

https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/242